A simple way to create good passwords (and remember them)

Discussions on technology and its application and implications in divorce

Re: A simple way to create good passwords (and remember them

Unread postby Randomizer » Wed Jan 13, 2016 4:54 pm

I do something similar to mock turtle and then add a couple of letters to the password from the particular website I'm on. For instance, if my password was 10^ps^tm, I might tack on the last two letters of the domain so my mensdivorce.com password would be 10^ps^tmce and reddit.com would be 10^ps^tmit.

A website shouldn't store you password in a form that it could be read and used elsewhere but some have been caught doing so.
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Re: A simple way to create good passwords (and remember them

Unread postby grandetaco » Wed Jan 13, 2016 6:49 pm

never answer the challenge question truthfully,

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palin

name of first girlfriend
Lovelace

first car
Studebaker

the trick is to come up with a scheme first and then use it.

2 step authentication works too.
But ALWAYS change pass often and review logon info.
“A woman worries about the future until she gets a husband, while a man never worries about the future until he gets a wife.”
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Re: A simple way to create good passwords (and remember them

Unread postby minuette » Wed Jan 13, 2016 7:38 pm

Considering that the password hacks used by spouses are meatware hacks (knowing a person's standard passwords) rather than brute-force or more sophisticated means, simply changing passwords and answers to challenge questions is sufficient to foil a spouse.

My standard password made IT at work say, "Damn, Min - I couldn't even remember that if I wanted to!" All based on my home internet router password - from 1998. I'm impervious to meatware hacks, at least.

But my password list is on file with my will. Which is one thing that needs to be considered when making mass changes - someone trustworthy should have means of account access. In my case, my eldest child also has an encrypted file with necessary info. Absent that, the file would reside with my eldest cousin, whom I would trust with my children and my life.
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Re: A simple way to create good passwords (and remember them

Unread postby a dad » Wed Jan 13, 2016 9:00 pm

Changing your username wherever possible, leaves the other spouse trying to hack into an account that doesn't exist.
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Re: A simple way to create good passwords (and remember them

Unread postby JimRockford » Sat Jan 16, 2016 4:15 am

minuette wrote:But my password list is on file with my will. Which is one thing that needs to be considered when making mass changes - someone trustworthy should have means of account access. In my case, my eldest child also has an encrypted file with necessary info. Absent that, the file would reside with my eldest cousin, whom I would trust with my children and my life.


In my field when we communicate with banks we use PGP encryption. It has to do with a public and private key, and many times a pass phrase is also used. In theory you could keep the passwords encrypted utilizing the public key with your will, but give the private key only to those that would receive the password file after you were to die.
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Re: A simple way to create good passwords (and remember them

Unread postby TeflonDad » Mon Nov 14, 2016 5:42 pm

I use LastPasss. It's now free for using on multiple devices. You can even setup a flash-drive live-linux browser with the plugin to run on someone else's computer.

Works great. Unique passwords for EVERY account. Definitely think of the "security questions" as "extra passwords". There is NO requirement that the question "your mother's maiden name" be TRUTHFULLY answered. Just make up some other password. I use LastPass to do that, and store the security questions and answers in the notes for the site.

You can always logout of LastPass and so then, you're down to memorizing the "last password" you need to remember. Make it a good one. Change it every couple of months or yearly. Make it a passphrase and not a password.

And then let LastPass do the work of remembering those impossible to remember random passwords. And because every site is a different password, anyone guessing one doesn't get any access to any other account.

And on your phone, you can simplify things by using their PIN function to set a 4-digit PIN that replaces the big long master password on your computer.

You can even use 2-factor to require a dongle/authy code to login and download your passwords safely encrypted on LastPass' servers. That way, when you logout, the ex can't login even if she knows your password. Stealing your phone and knowing your PIN is a different story. The LastPass folks are still working on that one. But it's light-years ahead of everything else and far, far better than any manual system you'll thunk up.

Lastly, you can export your entire vault into a text file and store it on a thumb drive to keep in your "in case of emergency" envelope with your lawyer or in your safe deposit box. Personally, I encrypt it using TrueCrypt/VeraCrypt with a *different* password and have instructions, start to finish, on how to plug in the thumb drive, mount the TrueCrypt drive using the emergency break glass password, and then access my passwords. I just have to mount the drive and export my LastPass vault periodically. I also have a text file with my one-time use emergency password codes for various accounts (including LastPass itself).

This comes in handy and you need your family/survivors to manage your affairs and TCB. There is no reason now that LastPass is free. The Premium version gets you some shared folders and I've not found that helpful unless you share accounts with relatives that have their own LastPass accounts. Even then, if you share a password, you share complete control over that account. It is helpful, however, if those accounts have 2-factor authentication on them (e.g. your EA/Origin or Steam accounts).
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